2019 Programme Schedule

Friday 22nd November

Time

Session

Presented by

12:00 – 13:00

Welcome Lunch and Registration

13.00 – 13.15

Welcome and Introduction to the GI Module

Mike Ash, DO, ND, BSc, RNT
13:15–14:30

Gastrointestinal Dysfunction, Chronic Disease, and the Functional Medicine Matrix Model

Gastrointestinal dysfunction is a core component of a variety of chronic disease processes. Comprehending the connections and interactions that take place in and around the gastrointestinal tract is of central importance to understanding gastrointestinal dysfunction, an essential part of any integrative approach to patient health. Equally important is developing practical skills to assess and treat these dysfunctions. Dr Hanaway will first review and clarify these relationships, using the Functional Medicine Matrix to show the key antecedents, triggers, and mediators that frame the core of this Advanced Practice Module.

Patrick Hanaway, MD
14:30–15:45

Functional Assessment of Digestive Dysfunction and Intestinal Permeability

What are the critical factors for proper digestion and absorption? Dr Mullin will catalogue and clarify the most common underlying causes of digestive dysfunction and will discuss mechanisms related to malabsorption and maldigestion.  He will also present a diagnostic model for digestive dysfunction and will review tools for assessment with emphasis on differentiating maldigestion and malabsorption etiologies.

Gerard Mullin, MD, MS, CNSP
15:45–16:15

Refreshments and Exhibition

16:15–17:45

The Gluten Conundrum

Reactions to wheat, including but not limited to the gluten protein, appear to be varied and widespread.  Dr Hanaway will explain how various proteins and other components in wheat form the basis for a variety of pathophysiologic responses.  He will also summarise other potential reaction aetiologies that can be mistaken for sensitivity to gluten. Lastly, he will differentiate the pathophysiology of coeliac disease from non-coeliac wheat or gluten sensitivity, and discuss the clinical ramifications of each.

Patrick Hanaway, MD
17:45–18.30

Questions and Answers Session

Patrick Hanaway, MD

Elizabeth Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, LDN

Saturday 23rd November (Day Two)

Time

Session

Presented by

8:00–9.15

Remove, Replace, & Replenish: The Diet Prescription and Supplementation Part 1

Nutritional inadequacies and insufficiencies in modern dietary patterns will be discussed by Dr Lipski. This will be followed by an introduction to various interventional food plans as well as a structural framework for developing individualized dietary prescriptions.

Elizabeth Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, LDN
9.15-9.30

Short Break

9.30–10.15

Remove, Replace, & Replenish: The Diet Prescription and Supplementation Part 2

This session will focus on enhancing optimal digestion and absorption. When should you utilise pancreatic enzymes, bile salts, or betaine hydrochloride in treatment? What are the best foods, botanicals, and nutraceuticals that can stimulate bile, increase mucus secretion, and soothe an irritated or inflamed gastrointestinal tract? How do you differentiate between enzyme products, cholagogues, and choleretics? Dr Lipski will delve into the treatment strategies involved in replacing, replenishing, and potentially restoring impaired digestive secretions.

Elizabeth Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, LDN
10.15–10.45

Refreshments and Exhibition

10.45–12.15

Stool and Urinary Evaluation of Dysbiosis

Dr Hanaway will define what gastrointestinal dysbiosis is as well as list common underlying antecedents, triggers and mediators.  To assist in diagnosis, he will discuss how to recognise potential signs and symptoms associated with gastrointestinal dysbiosis, as well as identify some of the myriad disorders that can be associated with dysbiotic imbalances. Lastly, he will describe some of the conventional and unconventional laboratory tests for appropriately diagnosing dysbiosis.

Patrick Hanaway, MD

12.15 – 13.30

Lunch and Exhibition

13.30–14.00

Gut Analysis: Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

Research and clinical practice continue to link Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) to an increasing number of conditions. In this session, Dr Mullin will describe the causes, clinical features, dominant types, pathophysiologic mechanisms, as well as the disorders commonly associated with SIBO.  Dr Mullin will explain various laboratory testing approaches for the diagnosis of SIBO, with emphasis on breath testing.

Gerard Mullin, MD, MS, CNSP
14.00 – 15.15

Navigating Dietary Options for Gastrointestinal-Related Disorders

Dr Lipski will highlight some of the foods and food components with high therapeutic value.  She will review a variety of specialised diets for GI healing, and then delve into dietary programs that may be most appropriate for specific patient conditions. The discussion will specify how and when to incorporate FODMAP/ Specific Carbohydrate and whole foods diets in clinical practice.

Elizabeth Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, LDN
15.15—15.45

Refreshments and Exhibition

15.45–17.15

Treating Dysbiosis: Weed, Seed, and Feed

Dr Hanaway will define what gastrointestinal dysbiosis is as well as list common underlying antecedents, triggers and mediators. To assist in diagnosis, he will discuss how to recognise potential signs and symptoms associated with gastrointestinal dysbiosis, as well as identify some of the myriad disorders that can be associated with dysbiotic imbalances. He will describe some of the conventional and unconventional laboratory tests for appropriately diagnosing dysbiosis. Lastly, he will discuss a multifactorial approach for long-term remediation of these conditions.

Patrick Hanaway, MD
17.15 – 18.00

Questions and Answers Session

Patrick Hanaway, MD

 

Elizabeth Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, LDN

Gerard Mullin, MD, MS, CNSP

18.00 – 19.00

Networking Drinks

Sunday 24th November (Day Three)

Time

Session

Presented by

7.30 – 8.00

Networking Breakfast (optional)

8:00–9.45

Treatment Options for GERD and SIBO

Research and clinical practice continue to link Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). In this session, Dr Mullin will describe the causes, clinical features, dominant types, pathophysiologic mechanisms, as well as disorders such as GERD that are commonly associated with SIBO. Dr Mullin will explain various laboratory testing approaches for the diagnosis of SIBO, with emphasis on breath testing.

Gerard Mullin MD, MS, CNSP
9.45-10.15

Refreshments and Exhibition

10.15-11.45

Treatment Options for IBD and Diverticulitis

In this session, Dr Mullin will discuss how to adequately address the various mediators of inflammation and free radical damage in gastrointestinal conditions such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Diverticulitis. Dr Mullin will describe important dietary, nutraceutical, and botanical treatment options.

Gerard Mullin MD, MS, CNSP
11.45–12.45

GI Dysfunction and Systemic Disease

Dr Hanaway will discuss a patient centred, Functional Medicine approach to case management, focusing on the GO-TO-IT heuristic. The presentation will include the advantages and disadvantages of testing options and specific interventions to consider.

Patrick Hanaway, MD
12.45 – 13.45

Lunch

13.45 – 14.15

Key Clinical Takeaways

The goal of this APM™ is to prepare the participant to accurately and confidently evaluate and treat a variety of conditions that are intimately connected to impaired gastrointestinal dysfunction. Dr Hanaway will close the onsite portion of the module with a reminder of key take-home messages and clinical applications that participants should be comfortable using.

Patrick Hanaway
14.15 – 15.00

Questions and Answers

Elizabeth Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, LDN

Gerard Mullin, MD, MS, CNSP

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